Rolling Hills

Kansas is full of fascinating places and sights! It isn’t just flat dry farmland. I swear! Check out all of these quirky attractions all around Kansas!

Built in 1931 in Wichita, Kansas, at a cost of $50,000, the Louise C. Murdock Theatre was designed with a “Spanish flair.” Originally built as a performance art theatre, in 2004, it was adapted to include film and video capabilities. The Louise C. Murdock Theatre was built as an addition to the Victorian-era 20th Century Center building.

 
On the left, a man waits for his lunch in a Valentine diner in Wichita, Kansas, while regular patrons in the back room talk over their meals. Another man reads a newspaper in a favorite booth. The red and white tiled floors, the red vinyl stools and booths with aluminum trim adds to the vintage feel and appeal. This diner building is a modified double deluxe Valentine model. These diners were manufactured in Wichita from the late 1930s into the mid-1970s. Sales of the buildings expanded nationwide, and soon Valentine diners were all over the United States. Many are still in use today.

 
The Bichet School was built in 1896 to educate children from a French-speaking near Florence, Kansas. The school continued to serve the community until 1946 when it closed because of low enrollment. The last class had two students. The Bichet School’s architecture is an excellent example of the typical one-room midwestern stone school built during the late 1800s.

 
This statue of a bullrider, by Glenn Stark, stands by the old Missouri Pacific Train Station, across from the fairgrounds, in Kingman, Kansas. The train station is now an antiques store. Glenn Stark created the statue in memory of Bandy Boswell, a bullrider who died as a result of a car accident in 1998.

 
A life-size bronze statue of Noah V. B. Ness stands in front of the Ness County Courthouse in Ness City, Kansas. The courthouse was built in 1917. The county was organized in 1873 with its county seat in Ness City, which was named by the Kansas Legislature in honor of Ness, corporal of Company G, Seventh Kansas Cavalry. Ness died Aug. 24, 1864, at Abbeyville, Miss., of wounds received in action, August 19, 1864, during the Civil War. Dedicated in June 2000, a plaque on the statue states: “This statue is in memory of Noah Ness and all of the brave men who fought to keep this country free.”

 
The Chase County Courthouse, designed in French Renaissance (Second Empire) style with a red mansard roof, is one of the most recognizable buildings in Kansas. The courthouse sits at the end of a wide brick street in Cottonwood Falls. Completed in 1873, it’s the oldest county courthouse still in use in Kansas and the second oldest in continuous use west of the Mississippi River.

 
A venerable cottonwood tree casts a shadow across the Bichet School in Autumn. How small the tree must have been when students were attending this now abandoned school in eastern Kansas. It still stands because of its sturdy construction. In the back lawn of the school are two stone outhouses. The Bichet School was built in 1896 to educate children from a French-speaking near Florence, Kansas. The school continued to serve the community until 1946 when it closed because of low enrollment. The last class had two students.

 
In 1906, the Kansas Daughters of the Revolution placed Santa Fe Trail Marker Number 35 near Canton, Kansas. The Old Santa Fe Trail was the path across the states of Missouri, Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico. The DAR’s marking of the trail involved the placement of ninety-six granite stones across the 500-mile route in Kansas. The Colorado DAR placed additional markers along the trail in Colorado.

 
The name Sherman has a special place in my heart so I had to add this to the wonderful sights of Kansas!
 
A sign for Sherman Street stands at the corner of Main and Sherman streets in front of an old building in Kingman, Kansas.

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