Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

Kansas City has a lot of amazing art culture. One of those places is the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Here is a beautifully shot spread of glimpses into this inspirational space.

Auguste Rodin’s sculpture “The Thinker” muses about the huge shuttlecock, which has landed on the lawn of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri, perhaps from some badminton game between giants. Rodin (1840–1917) of France is celebrated as the greatest sculptor since Michelangelo. His sculpture “The Thinker” was modeled in 1880 and has been cast many times. The sculpture at the Nelson-Atkins was cast in bronze in 1931.

 
A giant shuttlecock sculpture glows royal blue in honor or the Kansas City baseball team, which won in November 2015 its first national championship since 1985.

 
The shuttlecocks, installed in 1994, are among the most popular works at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. They were created by Claes Oldenburg and Coojse van Bruggen.

 
The original neoclassical museum building, opened in 1933, is on the right. The Bloch Building addition, to the left, opened in 2007. Both buildings are reflected in a pool in front. Underneath is a parking garage. The blue light is in honor of the Kansas City Royals’ second baseball Worlds Series in a row. Fountains and buildings throughout the Kansas City area were lit with Royal Blue light. The group of figures on the right in front of the Bloch Building is a bronze sculpture called “Rush Hour” by George Segal.

 
A full moon is reflected in the pool in front of the Bloch Building.

 
*** BONUS MUSEUM!!!! ***
The Central Museum of Communications in St. Petersburg, Russia! A Soviet Satellite is on display in the atrium of the Central Museum of Communications, which is named after A.S. Popova – one of the oldest scientific and technical museums in the world, was founded in 1872.

 

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